Editor's highlights from the November issue of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine

The November issue of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine has been released and as the Commissioning Editor for the journal, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight my top three articles from the latest issue.

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Journal of 3D Printing in MedicineAs the November issue of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine has been released, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight my top three articles from the latest issue


1- Investigation of future 3D-printed brace design parameters: evaluation of mechanical properties and prototype outcomes

My first choice is a research article by Kenwick JL Ng, Kajsa Duke and Edmound Lou entitled; “Investigation of future 3D-printed brace design parameters: evaluation of mechanical properties and prototype outcomes”. This research looks at 3D-printed spinal braces and how well they can help treat adolescent scoliosis. The team utilized different materials to print spinal braces and tested them for properties such as the thickness of the material, in order to decide which materials would be the most comfortable for patients wearing the brace.

This research is important for the healthcare system when considering what is the best option for a patient with scoliosis, as a 3D-printed brace could not only reduce manufacturing times but could also improve the well-being of the patient.

>> Find out more in the full article

2 - Emerging applications of 3D printing in nasoalveolar molding therapy: a narrative review

My second choice is a review by F Kurtis Kasper, Meredith M Ghivizzani and Brett T Chiquet, entitled; “Emerging applications of 3D printing in nasoalveolar molding therapy: a narrative review”. This review summarizes 3D printing technologies and their potential applications in nasoalveolar molding appliances, relating to surgical procedures treating cleft lip and palate. Applications covered include presurgical nasoalveolar molding therapy, digital modelling and 3D printing models based on digital software. 

This review highlights the importance of 3D printing in present-day medicine, as in this case with treating cleft lip, collaborative work across multiple fields and institutions could lead to the best treatment possible for the patient.

>> Find out more in the full article

3 - Digital transformation and 3D printing of transtibial load-bearing prosthesis in India: recent advances, challenges and future perspectives

My final choice is a special report by Soikat Ghosh Moulic et al. entitled “Digital transformation and 3D printing of transtibial load-bearing prosthesis in India: recent advances, challenges and future perspectives”. This report covers recent work in India towards access for patients requiring prostheses to 3D printing and additive manufacturing. In particular, the application of 3D printing in socket designs for prosthesis is considered, with an overview of the benefits and potential issues surrounding modern and traditional prosthetics provided.

This report covers the growing demand of prosthetics in India as Moulic et al. hope that their findings will help to produce 3D-printed sockets for use by amputees in the future. 

>> Find out more in the full article

Conclusion

In conclusion, throughout 2019 the fields of 3D printing, bioprinting and additive manufacturing in medicine have continued to grow and I anticipate that 2020 will see even more exciting research in these fields. If you are interested in more information regarding the journal or would like to submit your work, please do not hesitate to send me an email

Go to the profile of Daniel Barrett

Daniel Barrett

Commissioning Editor, Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine, Future Medicine

I am the Commissioning Editor for 3DMedNet's partner publication, the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine. if you have any questions or enquiries about submitting to the journal, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

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