Editor’s highlights from the latest issue of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine

Written by Adam Price-Evans

As the first Issue of Volume 4 of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine is now live, I would like to take this opportunity to focus on some of my highlights from this Issue as the journal’s Managing Editor.

As the first Issue of Volume 4 of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine is now live, I wanted to take this opportunity to focus on some of my highlights from this Issue. If you would be interested in publishing with the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine, please email Commissioning Editor, Heather Jones, at: [email protected] 


1 – Latest advances of bioprinting in space: an interview with Michael Gelinsky

In this Interview, Michael Gelinsky (Technische Universität Dresden, Germany) describes his team’s work with bioprinting in space as well as what the future may hold for bioprinting and additive manufacturing technologies in orbit.

Gelinksy describes some of the key challenges associated with conducting research of this nature on a mission in space and further discusses the benefits of bioprinting structures at zero gravity – an area often covered in 3DMedNet news stories.

“Additive manufacturing, and especially 3D bioprinting, is developing very quickly and we should therefore see tremendous progress concerning novel technologies, materials and strategies for printing of functional tissue constructs. Many of these developments are also relevant for application in space and therefore should be reviewed thoroughly…”

>> Find out more in the full interview


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2 – Cranial reconstruction using a polycaprolactone implant after burr hole trephination

This Preliminary Communication has more of a clinical focus as the authors describe a retrospective study evaluating the safety of using 3D-printed polycaprolactone burr hole covers over a 10-year period, further presenting principles of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

As the implants were shown not to affect infection rate, incidence of re-operation and incidence of death with evidence of tissue growth and implant bioresorption, the authors determine that the 3D-printed polycaprolactone implant could be a stable solution for burr hole cover implants, acknowledging that more studies are required to evaluate the biocompatibility, safety and efficacy of 3D-printed bioresorbable implants.

>> Find out more in the full article

3 – Fabrication of modified-release custom-designed ciprofloxacin tablets via fused deposition modeling 3D printing

Finally, my third highlight from this Issue is a Research Article on the fabrication of customized antibiotics by 3D printing for optimized dosing.

The team employed fused deposition modelling to test the effect of infill percentage on the speed at which the 3D-printed tablets would dissolve, releasing the active drugs, concluding that tablets produced in this way could be used to incorporate personalized drug release profiles for antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, based on infill patterns.

>> Find out more in the full article

>> Short on time? Read 3DMedNet’s summary of this research


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Conclusion

In summary, this Issue of the Journal of 3D Printing in Medicine highlights the diverse way in which 3D printing technologies are advancing both the clinical and preclinical research areas. I am looking forward to working on future 2020 issues as we consider the effect of COVID-19 on the additive community and further clinical applications of 3D printing in the medical field. If you would like to be involved in future Issues, please do not hesitate to email the Editor.