Editor’s highlights from ASGCT

Catch up on our Editor’s 3D printing research highlights from last week’s American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Virtual Annual Meeting (ASGCT; May 12–15 2020).

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As more events have transitioned to fully virtual formats, the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Virtual Annual Meeting (ASGCT; May 12–15 2020) was hosted online last week. In this post, catch up on our Editor’s 3D printing research highlights from the conference.

If you would like to work with us on an upcoming virtual event or are interested in finding out more about our webinar opportunities, get in touch with us today. 


Regional gene therapy for bone healing using 3D-printed scaffolds

Researchers have developed 3D-printed scaffolds to regional gene therapy in pre-clinical models, presenting an evaluation of the viability of their custom 3D-printed osteoconductive scaffold as a cellular delivery vehicle in a rat model.

The team matched a femoral sleeve scaffold to a defect site, 3D printing the scaffold from a hydroxyapatitecomposite, osteoconductive material. After being loaded with leniviral-vector-transduced rat bone marrow-derived MSCs, bone formation was assessed over 12 weeks.

Results suggested that treatment utilizing the 3D-printed bone scaffold lead to significant new bone formation, as the team concluded the 3D-printed osteoconductive hydroxyapatite-composite scaffold an effective carrier for transduced bone marrow cells, although was not in itself a promoter of healing.

The researchers further concluded that while the use of 3D-printed scaffolds in tandem with gene therapy may be a promising avenue for investigation, further work is required to optimize cell dosage and delivery.

Source: Kang H, Ihn H, Vakhshori V et al. Regional gene therapy for bone healing using 3D-printed scaffolds. Molecular Therapy. 28(4S1), 188 (2020)


Using numerical modelling (CFD) to design and improve a 3D-printed atomizer for the transfection of cells with virus

The first 3D-printed project covered as ASGCT included a numerical model for the design and subsequent development of a 3D-printed atomizer for viral transfection, highlighting the typical use of additive manufacturing as a rapid prototyping tool.

Justin O’Sullivan from APC Ltd (Dublin, Ireland) described how he utilized a numerical model to deliver an in-depth understanding of a custom-designed 3D-printed device, highlighting the key features affecting performance and aiding optimization of the spray delivery.

Combined with laboratory-scale experiments, the numerical model allowed for optimization of the device and spray delivery by defining the optimal operation conditions, thus reducing the number of experiments required, associated costs and time.

Following testing of the device, an additional 3D-printed component was numerically modelled, tested and applied to the device to promote even dispersion of the spray delivery.

Source: O’Sullivan J. Using numerical modelling (CFD) to design and improve a 3D-printed atomizer for the transfection of cells with virus. Molecular Therapy. 28(4S1), 32 (2020)


You can find out more about ASGCT and regenerative medicine highlights on our sister site, RegMedNet

Go to the profile of Georgi Makin

Georgi Makin

Senior Editor, 3DMedNet, Future Science Group

I am the Senior Editor of 3DMedNet, so please do not hesitate to get in touch should you have any queries or comments. You can also follow me on Twitter for the latest updates: @GeorgiMakin

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